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Calendar of Upcoming NIST Calibration Staff Presentation and Tutorial Workshops 2013

NCSLI Workshop & Symposium

July 14 - 18, 2013, Nashville, TN

Monday, July 15
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Session 2
(2C) Electrical I
Track: Metrology Concepts - Theory
Room: Ryman Ballroom CF

New 10V PJVS and its Application for NCSLI Josephson Voltage Standard Interlaboratory Comparison 2014
Yi-hua Tang, NIST

Coupling Quantum AC Voltage Standards and New Multijunction Thermal Converters to Improve the NIST ACDC-Calibration Services
Thomas E. Lipe, NIST

(2D) Mass: Concepts
Track: Metrology Skills - Technician/Bench Applications
Room: Ryman Ballroom AD

The Nitty-Gritty of Uncertainty Calculations in Mass Calibration
Patrick J. Abbott, NIST

Tuesday, July 16
8:30 am - 10:00 am
Session 3
(3A) Plenary: The New SI
Room: Ryman Studio MNO

How to Weigh Everything from Atoms to Apples Using the Revised SI
Jon R. Pratt, NIST

Tuesday, July 16
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Session 4
(4A) Panel: Educator's Forum
Room: Ryman Studio MNO

This is a session to share ideas with and for metrology educators. Educators will share information about their programs, gather input and creative ideas from other educators, and gather input from industry and government
participants about what new students need in the workplace.
Georgia L. Harris, NIST

Tuesday, July 16
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Session 5
(5C) Mass - Uncertanties
Room: Ryman Ballroom CF
Track Metrology Concepts - Theory

NIST Dynamic Force Calibration Facility
Akobuije Chijioke, NIST

Wednesday, July 17
8:30 am - 10:00 am
Session 6
(6B) Panel: Traceability without Uncertainty?
Room: Ryman Studio PQR

Metrological Traceability is defined in the International Vocabulary of Metrology – Basic and general concepts and Associated Terms (VIM), 3rd Edition, as "property of a measurement result whereby the result can be related to a reference through a documented unbroken chain of calibrations, each contributing to the measurement uncertainty." Since a measurement result itself is generally expressed as a single measured value and a measurement uncertainty, it is clear that the concept of metrological traceability is strongly dependent on the concept of measurement uncertainty. However, historically, the concept of traceability has been used in conjunction with measurement hierarchy schemes where measurement uncertainty has not been part of the scheme, at least not explicitly. For example, test accuracy ratios (TARS) along with control charts have been used very successfully in numerous measurement systems/schemes that invoke the principle of traceability, without measurement uncertainty being explicitly considered. This Panel will examine issues surrounding how metrological traceability can still be obtained, in a cost-effective manner, for such legacy measurement systems.
Charles D. Ehrlich, NIST 

(6C) Electrical - Theory
Room: Ryman Ballroom CF
Track: Metrology Concepts - Theory

Determining the Uncertainty of Frequency Measurements Referenced to GPS Disciplined Oscillators
Michael Lombardi, NIST

Wednesday, July 17
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Session 7
(7B) Traceability
Room:Ryman Studio PQR
Track: Management/Quality

The NIST Quality System for Measurement Services: A Gaze at its Past Decade and a Look towards its Future
Sally S. Bruce, National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP)

(7C) Pressure
Room: Ryman Ballroom CF
Track: Metrology Concepts - Theory The Uncertainty 

Development of an Optically-Based Primary Pressure Standard
Jay Hendricks, NIST

Wednesday, July 17
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Session 8
(8C) Dimensional I
Room: Ryman Ballroom CF
Track: Metrology Concepts - Theory

Picometer Metrology for Precise Measurement of Refractive Index, Pressure, and Temperature
Jack Stone, NIST

Thursday, July 18
8:30 am - 10:00 am
Session 9
(9C) Uncertainty
Room: Ryman Ballroom CF
Track: Metrology Concepts - Theory

Uncertainty of Calibration of Instruments, a Simple Example in Dimensional Metrology
Ted Doiron, NIST

(9D) Dimensional II
Room: Ryman Ballroom AD
Track: Metrology Skills - Technician/Bench Applications

Measuring Long Gauge Blocks Using a Coordinate Measuring Machine
John Stoup, NIST
 

For information and registration, please visit the NCSL International Website