Contents || Index
02/16/2010

Miscellaneous Samples

binary images | GIF file thermal scale image | Gif Images



 

Binary (Bit) Images

letterk.tif

This is how Lispix opens the file as of 2/16/10.  This is also how Photoshop* opens the file.

 

This is how Lispix used to open the file.  I've changed Lispix to follow the Photometric Interpretation parameter in the TIFF file. 

For this image file, the background has value 0 and the Letter K value 1.  Lispix always interprets 0 as black and white as 1.  HOWEVER, the photometricinterpretation tag of the TIFF file says that 0 is white and 1 is black.  Lispix therefore now inverts the pixel values after reading them and before displaying them - 0 is changed to 1 and 1 to 0.  If you wish the pixel values in Lispix to be what they are in the file, ignoring the photometricinterpretation parameter, use Image / Invert Pixel Values.


 

binary-a.tif

This is a bit image, stored in a TIFF file.  The TIFF format allows for storing bit images as bits (each byte has eight pixels encoded in it).  If this file is saved as raw, it will be about eight times larger, because the raw file format does not pack bits into bytes, but uses at least one byte for each pixel.  (Lispix asks you for the number of bytes and whether you want signed or unsigned bytes.)

 

Dialog seen after using Info / Size & Limits

 

Part of information shown by File / File Utilities Tool / TIFF / Header Info.  Note that the photometricinterpretation parameter specifies that white represents zero (therefore 1 is black).  This is the opposite of the way Lispix interprets pixel values, so Lispix as of 2/16/10, Version Lx161, inverts the pixel values after reading and before displaying.

 


global.gif

GIF file, Thermal Scale

Lispix opens GIF files in the normal way,with File / Open.

However Lispix opens color images as gray level unless told otherwise, and GIF files always use a look up table, and usually use color rather than gray level.

This is how the image should look.

 

This is how the image opens, unless you set the default for opening color images to color, using the expanded menu bar: