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Optical Spectroscopy of Nanostructures

Summary:

Understanding the underlying chemistry and physics of nanomaterials, including noble and transition metallic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene is the driver. While the tool of choice is Raman spectroscopy, we use a suite of measurement methods to characterize the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials that enable key applications, such as medicine and energy, as well as predict their impact on the Environmental Health and Safety (EHS).  

Description:

The Raman facility is unique. Multiple laser lines, two spectrometers including a triple grating, cryostats, magnetic field, and an atomic force microscope combined instrument, provide the basis for the measurement capabilities. Through our extensive in-house engineering and synthesis capabilities, we are able to uniquely synthesize the nanomaterials, fine tune their properties and isolate specific parameters for study. This cycle of production, isolation, and characterization is fundamental to a meaningful, detailed analysis.

Multidisciplinary collaborations, both those inside of NIST and beyond, are crucial to the group's success. By working in research teams, we learn more and contribute more fully to the physics of nanotechnology. NIST teams with which we actively collaborate include Carbon Nanotube Metrology, Biomagnetic Imaging, Graphene, and Nano EHS. 

Raman excitation profile of single-wall carbon nanotube dispersion. 

Raman excitation profile of single-wall carbon nanotube dispersion.

 

Lead Organizational Unit:

pml

Staff:

Angela Hight Walker, Project Leader
Adam Biacchi
Guangjun Cheng
Yanmei Piao
Erin Wood

Raman map of the G peak intensity from exfoliated graphene  where layer numbers between 1 and 6 can be identified. 

Raman map of the G peak intensity from exfoliated graphene where layer numbers between 1 and 6 can be identified.

Contact

Angela Hight Walker
301-975-2155

100 Bureau Drive, M/S 8120
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8120